How Will Knowing Effective Study Tools Affect Your HESI A2 Grammar Score?

hesi a2 grammar

Does the question above make sense? Can you understand the difference and meaning behind effect and affect and how it was used in this statement?

Knowing (or not knowing) the difference will absolutely affect your HESI A2 grammar score.

The HESI A2 Grammar section will cover all eight parts of speech, including adjectives and adverbs.

What you will be tested over are also the top ten grammatical mistakes. Knowing the difference between these troublesome word pairs will prepare you to ace the grammar section of the HESI exam.

Ready? Take notes!

Affect vs Effect:

  • Affect can be used as both a verb and a noun, though it is most often used as a verb. The noun form of affect means “an emotional state.” The verb form of affect means “to change or impact.”

    • His affect was very blue after he lost the game. (Here, affect is used as a noun.)
    • I teach because I want to have a positive affect on the children. (Here, affect is used as a )
  • Effect can also be used as both a verb and a noun, though it is most often used as a noun. The noun form of effect means “the result.” The verb form of effect means “to cause.”
    • He earned an A on his test, the effect of his studying. (Here, effect is used as a noun.)
    • She effected her car accident because she was not paying attention. (Here, effect is used as a verb.)          

Among vs Between

  • Among is used when describing a relationship of more than two thing or people.

    • Let's hand these fliers out among the crowd. (Here, the relationship is the crowd which consists of multiple people.)
    • The friendship I was talking about is among Annie, Brianna, and Cate. (Here, the relationship is three people.)
  • Between is used when describing a relationship of two things or people.

    • Go sit over there between those two girls. (Here, the relationship is two girls.)
    • Between you and I, I don't like the new science teacher. (Here the relationship is you and I which is two people.)

Amount vs Number

  • Amount is used when referring to things that cannot be counted. For example, trust and courage are things that cannot be counted.

    • The amount of courage he jumped in the water was impressive. (Here, courage is being Since it cannot be counted, amount is used.)
  • Number is used to count nouns. It is used in reference to things that can be counted. For         example, people and pencils are two things that can be counted in number.

    • I only need a small number of candles to cover the cake. (Here, candles are being Since it is something that can be counted, number is used.)

Good vs Well

  • Good is used as an adjective, whereas well is most often used as an adverb. Well answers the question “how?” and can sometimes be used as an adjective to describe physical health.

    • My teacher told me I did a good job with my homework. (Here, good is used as an adjective to describe )
    • My teacher told me I did my homework (Here, well is used as an adverb to explain how the homework was done.)
    • Do you feel well? (Here, well is used as an adjective to describe physical health.)
  • When referring to emotional health, good is used.

    • He did not feel good after she broke up with him.

Its vs It's

  • Its is a possessive of

    • The gorilla brushed its own teeth. (Here, its without the apostrophe is used because it has a possessive meaning in the sentence.)
    • I got a new wagon, and its color is a bright red. (Here, its without the apostrophe is used because it has a possessive meaning in the sentence.)
  • It’s is a contraction and means “it is” or “it has.”

    • It’s raining outside. (Here, it’s with the apostrophe is used because it means “it is” in this sentence.)
    • I know it’s been very busy for you at work. (Here, it’s with an apostrophe is used because it means “it has” in this sentence.)
  • A good way to remember which one to use is to substitute it’s in a sentence for it is or it has. If the sentence still makes sense, then it’s is the correct form. If it does not make sense, use the form,

Farther vs Further

  • Farther is used when referring to physical distance. It can be used as an adjective or an adverb.

    • My school is farther from my house than the grocery store. (Here, farther is used because it is referring to a physically measurable distance.)
  • Further is used when referring to nonphysical distances or things that cannot be physically measured. It can be used as an adjective, adverb, or a verb.

    • Do you have any further questions for me? (Here, further is used because it is referring to a nonphysical distance/amount.)

Then vs Than

  • Than is used only to compare things; then is not. Than is a conjunction. Then has multiple definitions. “At that time,” “next,” “also,” “in addition,” “in that case,” “therefore,” and “as a consequence” are all definitions of It is most often used as an adverb, but it can be used as an adjective or a noun at times.
  • Then
    • Then, he jumped from the ledge and almost knocked me down. (Here, then means “at that time.”)
    • If you have all your stuff, then you can leave. (Here, then means “in that case.”)
  • Than
    • I am taller than my brother. (Here, than is the correct word because it is comparing the height of two people.)
    • That bully thinks he is better than (Here, than is the correct word because it is comparing two people.)

Sentence fragments

  • Sentence fragments are incomplete sentences. They contain a dependent clause but no independent clause. Often, sentence fragments lack a subject verb relationship.

    • As he colored. (Here, this sentence lacks an independent clause. There is only a subject, he, and an action, )
  • A complete sentence should have three things: a subject, a verb, and an independent clause.

    • I cleaned the kitchen as he colored. (Here, the dependent clause from the example above is combined with the independent clause, I cleaned the kitchen, to make a complete sentence.)

Which vs That

  • Which is used to connect an unnecessary, dependent clause to a sentence. That is used to connect a necessary clause to a sentence.

    • Our house, which has three floors, is on Rutherford street. (Here, which is used because it connects the unnecessary clause, which has three floors, to the rest of the sentence. If this dependent clause was removed, the sentence would mean the same thing
    • Our house that has three floors is on Rutherford street. (Here, that is used because it connects a piece that is necessary to give the sentence full meaning. It can be assumed there are multiple houses and that identifies the specific house in mention.)

Fewer vs Less

  • Fewer is used when referencing things that can be counted, such as books, candles, or

  • Less is used when referencing things that cannot be counted. It is also used with collective nouns
    and abstract nouns.

    • I like him less than I like her. (Here, less is used because it is referring to something that cannot be counted.)
    • You have fewer marbles than I do. (Here, fewer is used because marbles is something that can be counted.)

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